Memoriabcn

Historical walks through the 20th century Barcelona  

Gòtic & Raval

ROUTE SITES


This is the point on La Rambla where the arrest of Andreu Nin took place, leader of the Workers’ Party of Marxist Unification (POUM), which had been made illegal following the Events of May 1937. Following his detention, Nin was murdered by Soviet agents. A plaque in memory of Nin was unveiled here in 1983.

After the Events of May 1937, the Republican Government launched a powerful campaign of repression against the POUM, the CNT and the FAI. In late-May, the POUM’s press organ, La Batalla, was closed, and on June 16 a decree was signed abolishing the party. That same day, the POUM executive committee members were arrested, along with the editorial staff of La Batalla and forty leading militants. All were taken to Valencia, with exception of their leader, Andreu Nin, who disappeared after his arrest at 128, La Rambla.

Andreu Nin was taken to the prison in Alcalá de Henares, where he was tortured in order to make him confess his guilt and the links between the POUM and agents working for Franco and Hitler. His imprisonment was not made public until June 22. He was finally murdered at an unknown point on the road from Alcalá to Perales de Tajuña. On June 25, the newspapers reported that the POUM members and Andreu Nin had been tried. However, in October 1938, a resolution was published stating that the evidence against Andreu Nin was false and that he was, consequently, innocent.

Andreu Nin (1892-1937) was one of the leaders of the revolutionary socialist movement in Spain. He became POUM general secretary in 1935, after the merger between the Field Worker Bloc (BOC) and Communist Left parties. During the war, he was Justice Minister for the Catalan Government from September to December 1936, setting up the popular tribunals and establishing the age of civil majority at 18 years.

Address: 128, Rambla de Canaletes || Coordinates: (LAT, LONG): 41.387028556, 2.170030499

  • Periods:
  • Second Republic
  • Civil War
  • Francoism
  • Transition
Memoriabcn